Tag: Cooling

Wireless sensors, DCIM drive holistic cooling optimization

Growing complexity in the today’s data centers has increased the risk of combining power, cooling, racks, cabling and management components to run an efficient facility due to the shortage of essential skills needed to design and integrate them.

Smart organizations therefore have turned to tightly integrated, aisle-based physical infrastructure modules, or PODs, along with non-containerized integrated infrastructure solutions to optimize the use of power, space and cooling capacity while simplifying specification, design, validation, procurement and installation.

Read the source article at Networks Asia

Coping With Data Deluge: Data Center Power, Cooling, Management Trends

Your data center is supporting more users, more business use cases, and a lot more data. Digital content and the Internet of Things are generating ever more data and will continue to do so. All of this places resource challenges on the data center facility.

Read the source article at Data Center Knowledge

Droughts, Heat Waves, and High Data Center Cooling Costs

Summer is not all fun. In the data center, IT and facilities teams are happy to see an end to summer and the extra strain it puts on the air handlers and cooling systems. Finance teams similarly celebrate an end to the higher utility bills.

Read the source article at Data Center Knowledge

Transparency: Customers Demand It – Can Data Centers Provide It?

Knowledge is power. As a colocation customer, can you imagine having real-time information on the power, cooling, and relative humidity being supplied to your IT assets available 24/7 on your mobile device? Plus, what if there were a way to verify whether or not your SLAs are being fulfilled?

Read the source article at Data Center Knowledge

A Green US Data Center with an Autonomous Power Supply

A new data center in the United States is generating electricity for its servers entirely from renewable sources, converting biogas from a sewage treatment plant into electricity and water. Siemens implemented the pilot project, which recently went into operation, together with Microsoft and FuelCell Energy. The data center is not connected to the public power grid. Siemens developed and installed intelligent control and monitoring technology for the plant as well as energy management software so that the servers can be reliably supplied with electricity at all times. The partners intend to demonstrate that using intelligent hardware and software, even critical installations such as data centers can be reliably operated with alternative energy sources.

Read the source article at Phys.org

Data Center 2.0 – The Emerging Trend in Colocation

In the past decade, companies in many industries have discovered the benefits of colocation. A purpose-built data center provides a safe and stable physical environment for a company’s critical computing systems, with sufficient power, cooling, and connectivity to guarantee server uptime and availability. 

Read the source article at Data Center Knowledge

Why Data Centers Look the Way They Do

Herb Zien is CEO of LiquidCool Solutions, a technology development firm with patents surrounding cooling electronics by total immersion in a dielectric fluid.

Predicting future data center space, power and cooling requirements has always been a challenge, recently compounded by the advent of enormous cloud computing facilities.

Read the source article at Data Center Knowledge

Top 5 Data Center Stories, Week of April 24th

For your weekend reading, we present a recap of five noteworthy stories that appeared on Data Center Knowledge this past week.

Microsoft’s Seven Tenets of Data Center Efficiency – While robots in data centers are a thing of the not-too-distant future, Microsoft already has some of the most efficient data centers in the world. Here are its key data center design principles.

Read the source article at Data Center Knowledge

ASHRAE will urge lower humidity to extend the safe limits for data centers

An ASHRAE study has concluded that data centers can reduce their environmental impact by relaxing their control over humidity. Guidelines published this year will recommend a bigger range of safe humidity levels, as well as letting data centers warm up.

IT equipment is more robust than most users realize, and the influential industry body ASHRAE has argued that data center operators can reduce the energy wasted in cooling data centers more than necessary. This year the body plans to do a similar job for humidity.

Read the source article at Datacenter Dynamics

Understanding the Benefits of Dynamic Cooling Optimization

Cooling optimization in a data center provides a significant opportunity for reducing operating costs since cooling systems consume 34 percent of the power used by a data center, according to Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory.

Due to the need to maintain five nines (99.999 percent) reliability, data centers are too often overdesigned in terms of the cooling capacity, and operating budgets pay the price for this practice.

Read the source article at Data Center Knowledge